The Centre for Mennonite Brethren Studies Archives has a goal which is to tell the past and present stories of the Manitoba Community in part by preserving and maintaining historical records of churches, schools and people. This photo below is one of the many items in their collection.
Permeating Canadian identity is a strong voice opposing armed conflict.  This is the message of the 2015 book, Worth Fighting for: Canada’s Tradition of War Resistance from 1812 to the War on Terror  (see http://www.commonword.ca/ResourceView/2/17781) The first laws recognizing conscientious objection in (Upper) Canada date back to 1793.  In WWII, almost 11,000 men from across Canada, from 33 ethnic backgrounds served as conscientious objectors.  They earned only 50 cents a day, with the rest of their wages going to the Red Cross. The men came away from their alternative service with new skills, friendships, understandings, and motivation to serve.    On Vancouver Island conscientious objectors (COs) cut down charred trees known as snags, preparing the way for the planting of 17 million trees by COs, that are worth $1.75 billion to the Canadian economy today.

Permeating Canadian identity is a strong voice opposing armed conflict. This is the message of the 2015 book, Worth Fighting for: Canada’s Tradition of War Resistance from 1812 to the War on Terror (see http://www.commonword.ca/ResourceView/2/17781) The first laws recognizing conscientious objection in (Upper) Canada date back to 1793. In WWII, almost 11,000 men from across Canada, from 33 ethnic backgrounds served as conscientious objectors. They earned only 50 cents a day, with the rest of their wages going to the Red Cross. The men came away from their alternative service with new skills, friendships, understandings, and motivation to serve. On Vancouver Island conscientious objectors (COs) cut down charred trees known as snags, preparing the way for the planting of 17 million trees by COs, that are worth $1.75 billion to the Canadian economy today.

To contact the Archives, call 204-669-6575 or email cmbs@mb.churches.ca.

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