New course for Winter 2016: Digital Media ANTH 4780/7900

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We graciously received these photos and information about Camp Hughes from the Carberry Plains Archives in Carberry, MB. The Archives was established in 1988 to acquire, preserve and document archival material which illustrates the growth and development of the town of Carberry and the rural municipality of North Cypress. It is one of the two oldest rural archives in Manitoba.

Carberry Plains Archives is located at 115 Main Street, Carberry, Manitoba. Please contact the Archives for visiting hours and more information.   204-834-2614 or cparchives@mymts.net.  Visit their website for more information http://www.mts.net/~archives/index.htm.

Carberry December 1943. My father 3rd on right, front row. Crest of 33 SFTS

Click here for more information on Camp Hughes.

The Centre for Mennonite Brethren Studies Archives has a goal which is to tell the past and present stories of the Manitoba Community in part by preserving and maintaining historical records of churches, schools and people. This photo below is one of the many items in their collection.
Permeating Canadian identity is a strong voice opposing armed conflict.  This is the message of the 2015 book, Worth Fighting for: Canada’s Tradition of War Resistance from 1812 to the War on Terror  (see http://www.commonword.ca/ResourceView/2/17781) The first laws recognizing conscientious objection in (Upper) Canada date back to 1793.  In WWII, almost 11,000 men from across Canada, from 33 ethnic backgrounds served as conscientious objectors.  They earned only 50 cents a day, with the rest of their wages going to the Red Cross. The men came away from their alternative service with new skills, friendships, understandings, and motivation to serve.    On Vancouver Island conscientious objectors (COs) cut down charred trees known as snags, preparing the way for the planting of 17 million trees by COs, that are worth $1.75 billion to the Canadian economy today.

Permeating Canadian identity is a strong voice opposing armed conflict. This is the message of the 2015 book, Worth Fighting for: Canada’s Tradition of War Resistance from 1812 to the War on Terror (see http://www.commonword.ca/ResourceView/2/17781) The first laws recognizing conscientious objection in (Upper) Canada date back to 1793. In WWII, almost 11,000 men from across Canada, from 33 ethnic backgrounds served as conscientious objectors. They earned only 50 cents a day, with the rest of their wages going to the Red Cross. The men came away from their alternative service with new skills, friendships, understandings, and motivation to serve. On Vancouver Island conscientious objectors (COs) cut down charred trees known as snags, preparing the way for the planting of 17 million trees by COs, that are worth $1.75 billion to the Canadian economy today.

To contact the Archives, call 204-669-6575 or email cmbs@mb.churches.ca.

ACA Mentorship Program Deadline is this Friday!

Friday, November 13 is the deadline for applications for the ACA Mentorship Program 2016!

Since its inception in 2004, the Mentorship Program has become one of ACA’s most popular programs. The Mentorship Program allows all ACA members to learn about and to actively participate in the growth and development of the Canadian archival community.  For those interested in the program, please visit the Mentorship Program page on the ACA’s website. The online forms for mentees can be found here.